PPP model for Ganga wastewater treatment wins World Bank Sustainable Development Award

The Public-Private Partnership for the wastewater treatment plants across the Ganga Basin, which has been supported by the Hybrid Annuity Model of World Bank won the World Bank’s Sustainable Development Vice President’s Award in 2018.

The Ganga Basin, where the project has been implemented, is home to 450 million people. The area has been reeling under problems like rapid urbanisation and population explosion which has directly affected the water assets in the area. Water pollution and water shortage are now two of the most potent problems in the area due to the stressed assets – around 8,000 million litres of untreated water flows through the Ganges every day, estimates say. However, if this is treated and reused for industrial purpose, it would relieve the area of the water shortage or pollution, even if not on a large extent.

The awarded World Bank model supported financing, maintenance and sustainable operations of the wastewater treatment plants across the banks of Ganges – in collaboration with the World Bank, International Finance Corporation and 2030 Water Resources Group (2030WRG). Under the Hybrid Annuity Model, 40 percent of the project cost is paid by the government, while the rest 60 is given away to the private bodies as annuities, over 15 years, the performance-linked payments associated with it also ensures the longevity and performance of the programme.

The public sector programmes trying to rejuvenate the Ganges had failed when this program was initiated, a World Bank blog post mentioned. Under an innovative PPP mechanism, the government then invited the private sector players for the municipal wastewater treatment.

The Public-Private Partnership for the wastewater treatment plants across the Ganga Basin, which has been supported by the Hybrid Annuity Model of World Bank won the World Bank’s Sustainable Development Vice President’s Award in 2018.

The Ganga Basin, where the project has been implemented, is home to 450 million people. The area has been reeling under problems like rapid urbanisation and population explosion which has directly affected the water assets in the area. Water pollution and water shortage are now two of the most potent problems in the area due to the stressed assets – around 8,000 million litres of untreated water flows through the Ganges every day, estimates say. However, if this is treated and reused for industrial purpose, it would relieve the area of the water shortage or pollution, even if not on a large extent.

The awarded World Bank model supported financing, maintenance and sustainable operations of the wastewater treatment plants across the banks of Ganges – in collaboration with the World Bank, International Finance Corporation and 2030 Water Resources Group (2030WRG). Under the Hybrid Annuity Model, 40 percent of the project cost is paid by the government, while the rest 60 is given away to the private bodies as annuities, over 15 years, the performance-linked payments associated with it also ensures the longevity and performance of the programme.

The public sector programmes trying to rejuvenate the Ganges had failed when this program was initiated, a World Bank blog post mentioned. Under an innovative PPP mechanism, the government then invited the private sector players for the municipal wastewater treatment.